Register Thursday | October 19 | 2017

Article Archive

Same Campus, Worlds Apart

International students are a huge boon to the economy, but as Carine Abouseif writes, bureaucracy and social isolation can make it tough for them to set down roots in Canadian soil.

Buried at Centre Ice

As Benjamin Hertwig reports, the Edmonton Oilers’ new arena has revitalized the city’s downtown­—and displaced its most vulnerable residents.

Black Market Babies

Religious matching and lax anti-trafficking laws led to a booming underground market for infants in mid-century Montreal. Adam Elliott Segal, the son of one such adoptee, investigates.

Growing Season

As family farms disappear from the Canadian landscape, eco-conscious first-generation farmers would like to take their place. But, as Nikki Wiart reports, this is easier said than done.

Ku Klux Canada

Robyn Maynard on our nation’s forgotten and far-from-over history of populist anti-Black violence.

Tall Tales from the Underground

An urban myth holds that Portland’s subterranean tunnels were used to kidnap sailors for cheap labour. Will Preston digs into the story’s facts and fictions.

The Language of Profit

Private language schools have always struggled to balance educational needs with their bottom line. Erika Thorkelson investigates how these tensions boiled over at one Vancouver school, leaving students and teachers out on the street.

It Takes the Village

Straight tourists and gawkers are flocking to Montreal’s LGBTQ neighbourhood, while the queer community disperses for new haunts. Tim Forster on the double-edged sword of mainstream acceptance.

Nuclear Fallout

Thousands of Ukrainians sacrificed their health during the Chernobyl disaster cleanup. Chris Scott investigates how recent budget cuts have decimated the pensions they were promised.

Highway Robbery

Will Johnson on how Canada's opioid crisis led to a bank heist and a high-speed chase in Nelson, BC.

A River Runs Through It

The last time British Columbia’s Fraser River burst its banks, entire communities were submerged. With aging dikes and a growing population, Heather Ramsay reports, next time may be worse.

DNA Discrimination

Canada is one of the only countries where people can be marginalized due to their genetics. But that may soon change.