Register Thursday | October 18 | 2018

Tagged: essay

Cat People

Montreal is a city of cats. Most get let out the door on Moving Day, never to find home again.

Picture Day

The West is inundated with images of refugees. But as Seila Rizvic explores, every wartime snapshot is also a family photo.

Crib Notes

Gavin Tomson reads Rivka Galchen’s Little Labors, reflecting on writers who mother and mothers who write.

Chain Reaction

What does it take to puncture cycling’s insular bro culture? Andrea Bennett speaks with the women mechanics inciting change in her community.

Moon Shot

With Operation Avalanche, Matt Johnson takes a characteristic risk to break into the American movie market. Adam Nayman on how the director is eschewing Canada’s cozy film industry and making his own success.

Everyone's a Critic

Corridart was designed to showcase Quebec artists during the 1976 Montreal Olympics. But, as Taylor C. Noakes writes, one very important person was less than impressed.

Will That Be All?

Alex Manley spent years working in a Montreal dépanneur that had something for everyone: cigarettes, newspapers and, beneath the counter, little baggies of mysterious white powder.

No Place Like Home

An influx of rich young urbanites into a neighbourhood often leads to an exodus of its lower-income residents. However, Samantha Edwards argues that gentrification doesn’t have to be a winner-take-all scenario.

In My Image

Prejudice often hides behind a secular mask. Fariha Roísín on the silencing of Muslim feminists.

Old Haunts

The night I moved into my apartment, I heard my roommates planning to cleanse the house of evil spirits.

Twin Peaked

Don’t get too excited for the reboot of David Lynch’s cult series, Maija Kappler warns. The show was tired before it got cancelled the first time.

Herd Mentality

Why does sexism take over Calgary’s streets during Stampede season? Lyndsie Bourgon investigates gender roles in Canada’s Wild West.

Jerry Rigged

It’s easy not to be the butt of the joke when you’re the one writing it. Adam Nayman on how Seinfeld’s comedic brilliance relied on a privileged perspective.