Register Tuesday | August 22 | 2017

Tagged: feature

The Language of Profit

Private language schools have always struggled to balance educational needs with their bottom line. Erika Thorkelson investigates how these tensions boiled over at one Vancouver school, leaving students and teachers out on the street.

It Takes the Village

Straight tourists and gawkers are flocking to Montreal’s LGBTQ neighbourhood, while the queer community disperses for new haunts. Tim Forster on the double-edged sword of mainstream acceptance.

Nuclear Fallout

Thousands of Ukrainians sacrificed their health during the Chernobyl disaster cleanup. Chris Scott investigates how recent budget cuts have decimated the pensions they were promised.

Highway Robbery

Will Johnson on how Canada's opioid crisis led to a bank heist and a high-speed chase in Nelson, BC.

A River Runs Through It

The last time British Columbia’s Fraser River burst its banks, entire communities were submerged. With aging dikes and a growing population, Heather Ramsay reports, next time may be worse.

Burning Bush

Canada is experiencing an unprecedented number of wild fires. As Sharon J. Riley investigates, our obsession with putting out flames may be what’s fuelling them.

Picture Day

The West is inundated with images of refugees. But as Seila Rizvic explores, every wartime snapshot is also a family photo.

Paradise Lost

Making a park isn’t as simple as drawing lines on a map. Jimmy Thomson on the politics, petroleum and polar bears that have shaped one Arctic conservation area thirty years in the making.

Mic Drop

Festivals are being heralded as the savior of the music industry. But as Miranda Campbell writes, there's one big problem: women are being left out of the spotlight.

Everyone's a Critic

Corridart was designed to showcase Quebec artists during the 1976 Montreal Olympics. But, as Taylor C. Noakes writes, one very important person was less than impressed.

Back to the Drawing Board

Richard Williams spent more than twenty-five years creating what has been called the greatest film never released. Peter Henderson illustrates the story of the Canadian animation icon whose masterpiece ended his Hollywood career.

The Unbelievers

Leaving Islam often means isolation and intense social pressure from friends and family. Graeme Bayliss on how former Muslims are coming together to show that there is life after faith.

Home Truths

In the Yukon, those with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder rarely find the care they need. Rhiannon Russell on a deadly lack of support.

Worth the Risk?

For most patients, morcellation means less-invasive surgery. For others, it can be a death sentence. Alison Motluk investigates why two former Harvard doctors are trying to ban a procedure that left one of them riddled with cancer.

Law V. Lust

Canada’s new prostitution act is supposed to keep workers safe, but many in the profession say it puts them in danger. As Arielle Piat-Sauvé reports, the fight to sell sex safely is far from over.

More Than Words

Our education system isn’t designed to help second-generation Canadians retain non-official languages. Chantal Braganza on why losing a mother tongue is akin to losing a part of yourself.

The Mountain Carver

Sculpture has always been a controversial art form in Iran, but that is where Parviz Tanavoli has found his greatest inspiration.

Herd Mentality

Why does sexism take over Calgary’s streets during Stampede season? Lyndsie Bourgon investigates gender roles in Canada’s Wild West.

The Parallel Highway

The Montreal writer Carol Dunlop and the Argentinian novelist Julio Cortázar carried out one of the greatest literary love affairs of the twentieth century. But their romance was shadowed by tragedy.

Ol' Talk

After years of burying her Trinidadian accent, the author reawakens to the richness of her native tongue.

Cheddargate

Canadian dairy is one of the most formidable forces in Ottawa. How did our lactose overlords get so powerful?

The Forgotten Internment

When World War II threatened a remote chain of islands off the Alaskan coast, the indigenous Aleut people were displaced from their homes.